Lavender Honey Ice Cream with Raspberry Swirl


The last ice cream post of 2015! Unless I decide to make a winter ice cream, which may happen… Ice cream is best enjoyed in the summer, fall, winter, spring, morning, afternoon, evening, alone, with friends, and every time in between. There is no bad time for ice cream.


Now that we've figured out exactly when it is okay to eat ice cream (anytime), can we talk about this beautiful honey?! I was given this jar of locally made Mellifera Bees lavender infused honey by my momma (Hi Mom!) and was completely taken by it. Deliciously smooth, luscious, and just the right amount of lavender flavour. 

But I had a bit of a difficult time deciding what to use it in. I wanted both the honey and the lavender flavour to come through, but I didn't want it to be too cloyingly sweet or overpoweringly floral. I did a few little experiments, but found that this ice cream was the perfect solution! The honey and lavender flavours are subtle but definitely present and the tart raspberry swirl offsets the sweetness perfectly. 


I'm a sucker for locally made goods (I think it's a requirement for bloggers to like locally made things, farmers markets, and autumn) but Mellifera Bees goes a step further - not only are the bees hives located in Vancouver and the Lower Mainland, but the infusions, such as cardamom, lemon, and vanilla, are sourced from BC companies, too! And look at that packaging guys! Just beautiful. 


I love the lavender honey, but I'm dying to try the vanilla or lemon infused honey as well! The cardamom infused honey is also calling my name now that the weather is turning a bit cooler. Really, I just want all their honey. All of it. 

If you live in Vancouver, Mellifera honey is sold in stores all over! Bel Café, Beaucoup Bakery (go there for their pastries, too, oh my god), Café Bica, Whole Foods, and lots of other stores. They also are sold in a few stores in Victoria, Salt Spring, Calgary, and Toronto! If you don't live in Canada, you're missing out on a great country, but you can still get your honey shipped to you. 


Lavender Honey Ice Cream with Raspberry Swirl

480 g heavy cream
230 g whole milk
100 g lavender infused honey
160 g egg yolks

260 g raspberry purée
60 g sugar
4 g vanilla paste

In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, combine the milk and cream. In a small bowl, whisk together the egg yolks and sugar until slightly paler in colour.

When the milk mixture has come to a boil, slowly pour a small amount into the yolk mixture, whisking continuously. Continue tempering the yolks with the milk mixture, then transfer all of back into the saucepan. Cook over medium-low heat, stirring continuously with a rubber spatula, until the mixture has thickened enough to coat the back of a spoon and a thermometer reads 82 C. 

Remove from heat and strain through a fine-mesh sieve into a bowl set over an ice bath. Cool the mixture down to room temperature. Place a piece of plastic wrap directly on the surface to prevent a skin from forming and refrigerate overnight.

For the raspberry swirl, combine the purée, sugar, and vanilla paste in a saucepan set over medium heat. Heat it just enough to dissolve the sugar, then transfer to an airtight container and refrigerate overnight.

Churn the ice cream according to the manufacturers instructions, then transfer to a pre-chilled container such as a loaf pan. Drizzle the raspberry swirl mixture and use a spoon or small rubber spatula to swirl it into the ice cream.

 Freeze for 1 to 2 hours until the ice cream has hardened completely. 

Roasted Strawberry and Balsamic Vinegar Ice Cream Sandwiches


Whoever thought of making ice cream into a hand-held treat surrounded by two delicious cookies is a straight up genius. It's tough to take something already so awesome like ice cream and make it even more awesome. But ice cream sandwiches are proof that it can be done.




Strawberries and balsamic vinegar are a classic combo. The sweetness from the strawberries and the tartness from the vinegar, plus a bit of roasting to enhance the flavours of both, and you've got a winner, winner, chicken dinner (with ice cream for dessert). Just the roasted strawberries and vinegar are perfect as they are. If you either a.) don't have an ice cream machine or b.) are simply too lazy to make ice cream, I'd suggest spooning the strawberries and balsamic-y syrup overtop store-bought ice cream to amp it up a little. Or on top of yogurt, in smoothies, on oatmeal, on toast, whatever you want. You do you.


I used my favourite cookie recipe for the "bread" of the sandwich, but feel free to use whatever cookie is your favourite! Just make sure it will hold up when you're eating it - shortbread might be a bad idea. No one wants an ice cream sandwich falling apart in their hands. It's a messy business.


Roasted Strawberry and Balsamic Vinegar Ice Cream Sandwiches


Roasted Strawberry and Balsamic Vinegar Ice Cream
Recipe adapted from Frozen Desserts

250 g strawberries
50 g granulated sugar
75 g balsamic vinegar

570 g whole milk
80 g heavy cream
180 g granulated sugar
70 g egg yolks

Chocolate Chip Cookies

220 g all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
125 g unsalted butter, at room temperature
125 g granulated sugar
105 g firmly packed light brown sugar
1 egg
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
185 g chopped dark chocolate


For the ice cream, preheat the oven to 400 F.

Start by slicing the strawberries into 1/2 inch thick slices and placing them in a medium mixing bowl. Sprinkle the sugar and balsamic vinegar over and toss to combine. Spread evenly on a baking sheet lined with parchment and roast until tender, about 8 to 10 minutes. Remove from the oven and let cool completely.

Transfer the strawberries and all the juices into a blender or food processor and purée until smooth. Strain the purée through a fine-mesh sieve to remove the seeds. You should have around 100 g of strawberry purée. If you have more, reserve it and use it on top of ice cream/yogurt/in smoothies. 

In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, combine the milk and cream. In a small bowl, whisk together the egg yolks and sugar until slightly paler in colour.

When the milk mixture has come to a boil, slowly pour a small amount into the yolk mixture, whisking continuously. Continue tempering the yolks with the milk mixture, then transfer all of back into the saucepan. Cook over medium-low heat, stirring continuously with a rubber spatula, until the mixture has thickened enough to coat the back of a spoon and a thermometer reads 82 C. 

Remove from heat and strain through a fine-mesh sieve into a bowl set over an ice bath. Cool the mixture down to room temperature, then whisk in the strawberry purée. Place a piece of plastic wrap directly on the surface to prevent a skin from forming and refrigerate overnight.

Churn the ice cream according to the manufacturers instructions, then transfer to a pre-chilled container such as a loaf pan. Freeze for 1 to 2 hours until the ice cream has hardened.

For the cookies, preheat the oven to 350 F. Have ready 2 ungreased baking sheet. Sift the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt onto a sheet of waxed paper, set aside.

Using an electric mixer on high speed, cream the butter until fluffy and pale yellow. Add the granulated and light brown sugars and continue beating. Add the egg and the vanilla and mix on low speed until incorporated. Scrape down the bowl and mix for another few seconds.

Add the dry ingredients to the butter mixture and mix on low speed until just blended. Add the chopped chocolate and stir in.

Using damp hands, shape the dough into 35-40 g balls (this is the ideal weight, I find. Make them bigger or smaller if you want, though). Do not flatten the balls. Place them about 2 inches apart on your ungreased baking sheets and bake for 12 minutes, until the edges are slightly golden brown. Let the cookies cool on the sheet briefly and then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely. Freeze the cookies for 30 minutes before assembling the ice cream sandwiches.

To assemble the ice cream sandwiches, place a scoop of ice cream on the bottom side of a cookie, then gently press a second cookie on top until the ice cream almost reaches the edges. Place in the freezer immediately. Repeat with the remaining cookies and ice cream. 




Passion Fruit Mint Sorbet + Sorbet Float


It seems like spring took its sweet time getting here but summer is already chomping at the bit. Or maybe everyone is just so excited about the nice weather that we're getting a little ahead of ourselves. We're already looking forward to the next season, don't you think?

I'm still settled in with the spring flavours (rhubarb and strawberries - hello!) around here and I think I may have created one of the most refreshing darn things ever. Super bright and tangy passion fruit, herbaceous and refreshing mint, together in one smooth icy treat!



Mint is one of those herbs that just screams "refreshing". It just seems to make everything that much fresher and brighter, especially in an ice cold drink. How many people order Mojitos only when it's patio season? Me, for one. I had one last night on a patio and it was glorious.

To me, sorbet is one of the most refreshing things you can have when the weather is hot and you've got a bead of sweat dripping down your back (ugh). Ice cream is great, but the cream and egg yolks are heavy and rich and sometimes when you need a cool down, you need something a bit lighter. 



This post was inspired by the super cools folks over at Produce Candles and their seasonal monthly candle! They have all kinds of fresh produce inspired candles, like cilantro, radish, carrot, and more! This month is Mint and I wanted to make something that captured the crazy refreshing aspect of this awesome herb. And not only did I make a sorbet, but that sorbet can also be a drink, simply with the addition of sparkling water or sparkling wine! A perfect drink for sitting on the deck with a couple friends and some good food (man, I really wish I had a big deck or a patio). 




If you're in a rush and don't have time to churn the sorbet and wait for it to freeze - or you don't have an ice cream maker - you can just make the base and use that for drinks! You could use it for cocktails or maybe even sangria! 





Passion Fruit Mint Sorbet

220 g water
220 g granulated sugar
15 g fresh mint leaves

391 g passion fruit purée

Sorbet Float

1 large scoop of sorbet
4-5 fresh mint leaves
Sparkling water/wine


For the sorbet, combine the water and sugar in a saucepan over medium heat. Stir the pot occasionally and bring just to a boil, then remove from heat. Add the mint leaves and let it steep for 3 minutes. Strain the mint leaves out.

Combine the passion fruit purée and the mint simple syrup and refrigerate until cool, about 1 hour. Place your container for the sorbet in the freezer to chill.

Churn the sorbet according to the ice cream makers instructions and transfer to the pre-chilled container. Let it freeze for 2 hours.

For the float, scoop the sorbet into a glass and put the mint leaves on top. Add the sparkling water/wine, give it a stir to combine, and enjoy!


Raspberry Rhubarb Pie with Lemon Buttermilk Ice Cream


The first pie of the year! And the first ice cream of the year! I couldn't help but include both in the same post because after all, what's pie without ice cream? And this pie and this ice cream were made for each other. Both are sweet with a punchy tangy note to remind you that HEY - the sun is out, the birds are singing, and it's light out until like 8pm, holy crap.



Both the pie and the ice cream are awesome on their own, so don't feel like you have to make both at the same time, but you really should make both at the same time

Think about it this way: Bread is pretty good. Cheese is also pretty good. But grilled cheese is better. 

And what kind of person would I be if I didn't recommend that you make a grilled cheese?

I think in carbs, I can't help it.


The nice weather we've been having here in Vancouver (for the most part) has totally given me a kick in the butt, in a good way. Not only am I all about the spring fruits and bright flavours, but on the weekends, I've been cooking actual meals (falafel wrapsbroiled corn tacospizza, and just this morning - sumac and tomato focaccia!). Some awesome cookbooks came in the mail the other day and I've been having a field day looking through them! I'm a little overwhelmed by the amount of things that I want to make from them, I almost wish I had a big family to cook for every night instead of just me and my cat.



I used to regard cooking as a bit of a hassle. Of course I wanted to eat nice meals and the act of cooking was pretty fun too, but finding a recipe, hoping I have all the equipment, getting the ingredients form multiple stores, and then finding time to make everything was a daunting thought. It was easier just to have toast, you know? But it's so much easier than I thought and totally worth it! You can't beat that sense of satisfaction that comes from making a good meal from scratch, either. 

I don't really get that with desserts, but I think that's because pastry and baking in my career so I'm always worrying about the technical side of things, how long it takes me to make something, and the tiny details in presentation. It's nice to have a break from all that pressure with cooking for myself. 

Of course, I'm never going to stop making desserts in my free time. A nice dinner is great and all, but there's something to be said for finishing the day off with a big warm slice of pie topped with a slowly melting scoop of ice cream.




Raspberry Rhubarb Pie with Lemon Buttermilk Ice Cream

Lemon Buttermilk Ice Cream
Recipe from Frozen Desserts

542 g whole milk
103 g heavy cream
3 lemons, zested
183 g granulated sugar
62 g egg yolks

110 g buttermilk

Pie Dough

430 g all-purpose flour
3 g kosher salt
15 g granulated sugar
230 g unsalted butter, cold, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
250 mL cold water
62 g cider vinegar
100 g ice


Pie Filling

450 g fresh rhubarb, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
200 g raspberries
150 g granulated sugar
80 g light brown sugar
12 g cornstarch
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground green cardamom
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1 egg

Egg wash
Coarse sugar



For the ice cream, combine the egg yolks and sugar in a medium bowl and whisk until slightly paler in colour.

Combine the milk, cream, and lemon zest in a saucepan set over medium heat. When the milk mixture is just below a simmer, remove the pan from the heat and, whisking constantly, slowly pour one-third into the egg mixture. Slowly pour in the remaining milk mixture. Transfer back to the saucepan and place over medium heat. Whisking constantly, cook the anglaise until it is thick enough to coat the back of a spoon and reaches a temperature of 80 C.

Strain the mixture through a fine-mesh strainer into a bowl set over an ice bath. Stir in the buttermilk while the mixture is still warm. Cool to room temperature, then place a piece of plastic wrap directly on the surface to prevent a skin and refrigerate overnight.

Place your ice cream container in the freezer for at least 20 minutes. Churn your ice cream according to the manufacturer's instructions, then transfer to your pre-frozen container. Place a piece of plastic wrap directly on the surface to prevent a skin from forming and freeze for two hours.

For the pie crust, stir the flour, sugar, and salt in a large bowl. Add the butter pieces and coat with the flour mixture using a bench scraper or spatula. With a pastry blender, cut the butter into the flour mixture, working quickly until mostly pea-sized pieces of butter remain.

Combine the water, cider vinegar, and ice in a large measuring cup. Sprinkle two tablespoons of the ice water mixture over the flour mixture, and mix and cut it in with a bench scraper until it is fully incorporated. Add more of the ice water mixture, 1 to 2 tablespoons at a time, using the bench scraper or your hands (or both) to mix until the dough comes together in a ball, with some dry bits remaining. Squeeze and pinch with your fingertips to bring all the dough together, sprinkling dry bits with more small drops of the ice water mixture, if necessary, to combine. Divide the dough into two flat disks, wrap in plastic wrap, and refrigerate for at least 1 hour, preferably overnight, to give the crust time to mellow.

Remove one disk of dough from the fridge 5 to 10 minutes before you begin rolling. Lightly flour your work surface and roll the dough out to 1/8 inch thickness and about 11 inches in diameter. Line your pie tin, trim the excess, and refrigerate for 20 minutes.

Remove the second disk of dough from the fridge 5 to 10 minutes before you begin rolling. Roll the dough out to 1/8 inch thickness and cut strips 1/2 inch in width for your lattice. Transfer to a baking sheet and refrigerate for 20 minutes.

For the pie filling, combine the rhubarb, raspberries, granulated and brown sugars, cornstarch, cinnamon, cardamom, and salt in a large bowl and toss to combine. Stir in the egg. Pour the filling into the chilled pastry shell, arrange the lattice on top, and crimp as desired.

Chill the pie in the refrigerator for 10 to 15 minutes to set the pastry. Meanwhile, position the oven racks in the bottom and centre positions, place a rimier baking sheet on the bottom rack, and preheat the oven to 425 F.

Brush the pastry with egg wash to coat, being careful not to drag the filling onto the pastry. Sprinkle with the desired amount of coarse sugar.

Place the pie on the rimmed baking sheet on the lowest rack of the oven. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, or until the pastry is set and beginning to brown. Lower the temperature to 375 F, move the pie to the centre oven rack, and continue to bake until the pastry is a deep golden brown and the juices are bubbling throughout, 30 to 35 minutes.

Allow to cool completely on a wire rack, 2 to 3 hours. Serve slightly warm or at room temperature with a generous scoop of ice cream.


Chocolate Custard Ice Cream


My mom, her boyfriend, my brother, and his girlfriend came for a little visit this week. They rented a cabin here at the lodge and I booked a few days off work, so I was able to stay with them in the cabin. We did a bit of surfing, went on a day trip to the natural hot springs, ate some great food, and just had a nice relaxing time up here in Tofino.

It's back to work and the daily routine, but I realized the other day that I have a little less than four weeks left here in Tofino. I have mixed feelings about this. Mostly, I'm really excited to go back home. I can't wait to see my boyfriend again and cuddle my little kitty. I can't wait to sleep in my own bed. I can't wait to be back in my own apartment. I can't wait to be back home.

But I will miss living on the beach. I'll miss going surfing. I'll miss the rugged and beautiful landscape of the west coast. I'll kind of miss living 5 minutes away from work because waking up at 4 AM is bad enough without any sort of transit time. I'll miss the quiet and slow pace of this surf town. 


All in all, I'm excited to go back home. I miss blogging! And yes, I know I have been blogging ever since I left but what you may not know is that everything that I've posted for the past three months was made and photographed back in May! Everything! There was no way for me to bring all my food props, camera, tripod, and baking equipment all the way over here, so I had to stock up on posts before I left. I miss making things and photographing them, as frustrating as it can be sometimes. I've got lists of ideas for things that I want to make when I get home and I'm dying to get to it. 

In the meantime, I'll leave you with a few things around the internet that I think are pretty darn cool.


 A new favourite song and an old favourite.

I think this bread baker and his bread porn is my favourite account on instagram. I mean, look at his breadLook. At. It.

This sandwich makes me want to curl up with a warm sweater and a bowl of hearty soup, even though I was lying on the beach just yesterday.

If you read my post last week, you'll know I'm a little nuts about Christmas. I think I've doubled the pins on my Christmas Pinterest board over the past couple of days. I can't stop.

My boyfriend and I used to get a roasted eggplant dish from our favourite Indian place every week but once I'm back home, maybe I'll try making this for him instead!



Even though I already have four aprons (including one with cats on it), I still want this gorgeous apron.

Speaking of kitchen wear with cats on it, I need this.

I wish I could buy this cake turntable but Food52 doesn't ship to Canada, eh! Bummer.

While I'm still looking for a cake turntable, I bought this beautiful wooden cake stand!

The photographs of this nectarine tart are simply beautiful, as always.

I wish I had taken chemistry back in high school but I am still loving this lecture at Harvard University about chocolate. There's also tons of lectures on all kinds of other food science topics, such as gelation, food textures, sous-vide cooking, and more.



Chocolate Custard Ice Cream

250 g whole milk
500 g heavy cream
150 g sugar
25 g glucose/ light corn syrup
25 g alkalized cocoa (Dutch processed)
1 g salt
100 g egg yolks
125 g 73% dark chocolate, finely chopped

Whisk together the cocoa powder with half the sugar in a saucepan. Pour in a tiny bit of milk to make a smooth paste before slowly adding the rest of the milk and cream. Add the glucose or corn syrup and the salt.

Whisk the egg yolks and remaining half of the sugar until slightly paler in colour.

Heat over medium heat and bring to a gentle boil. Slowly whisk in the hot milk mixture into the egg yolk mixture. Return to the pot and cook over low heat, using a rubber spatula to continuously stir the custard. Cook until it is thick and coats the back of a spoon (or until it is 80 C).

Remove from heat and pour over the chopped chocolate, whisking to melt it.

Strain through a fine-mesh sieve and cool in an ice bath until it is room temperature, giving it a stir every so often to prevent a skin from forming.

Once it is cool, place a piece of plastic wrap directly on the surface of the custard to prevent a skin from forming and refrigerate overnight.

Churn according to the manufacturers instruction. Place into a pre-chilled container and place a piece of plastic wrap directly on the surface to prevent freezer burn. Freeze until hard, at least 2 hours.

Brown Butter Ice Cream


Everybody loves brown butter. Even if you don’t know what brown butter is, you love it. You will love it. 

Brown butter is basically caramelized butter. The milk solids in the butter toast and brown, giving a whole new flavour profile. Think about plain granulated sugar. Now think of caramel. Both are sugar, but they are wildly different from each other in all other aspects. It’s the same with brown butter. It’s still butter technically, but there are complex and rich flavours going on in there now. You wouldn’t have butter ice cream, but you can certainly have brown butter ice cream.




The Maillard reaction is your best friend, no matter who you are. It’s what makes things taste good. That delicious mouth-watering smell of a steak on a grill? Maillard reaction. The depth of flavour in caramel? Maillard reaction. The smooth and dark taste of well-roasted coffee? Maillard reaction. 



Science lesson! The Maillard reaction is actually a complex series of chemical reactions involving amino acids during heating, usually around 155 to 160 degrees celsius. It is similar to caramelization, but they are actually two different things, as the Maillard reaction involves amino acids. The process of the reaction creates thousands of different flavour compounds, which in turn create more flavour compounds. That’s what roasted, toasted, and browned things have more flavour than their raw counterparts.




Back to brown butter. When added to cream, egg yolks, and sugar, it becomes something extraordinary. It’s creamy, nutty, smooth, and downright decadent. I mean, brown butter and ice cream, together. Really. I’ve gone a bit far here, don’t you think?

Just kidding. Not too far at all. 





Brown Butter Ice Cream
Recipe from Frozen Desserts


Brown Butter

200 g unsalted butter, soft

Ice Cream

686 g skim milk
160 g sugar
74 g egg yolks
80 g brown butter


For the brown butter, place the butter in a saucepan over high heat; melt and cook the butter until the milk solids start to caramelize. They will smell like toasted hazelnuts (which is why brown butter is also known as "beurre noisette").

Cool the butter to room temperature.

Place the milk in a saucepan along with half of the sugar (80 g). Place over high heat and stir to dissolve some of the sugar. While this mix comes to a boil, place the egg yolks and the remainder of the sugar (80 g) in a bowl. Whisk until it becomes a uniform mass.

Once the liquid comes to a boil, slowly pour half of it into the egg yolk-sugar mixture while whisking constantly. Once half of the liquid has been tempered with the egg yolk-sugar mixture, pour the contents of the bowl back into the saucepan while whisking constantly and turn the heat down to medium or medium-low. Whisk constantly until the mixture reaches 76 C/ 170 F. At this temperature, the mixture reaches a consistency called nappe, or "coat".

Add the brown butter to the ice cream base when it is just made and it is still hot. Add the brown butter in liquid form, not when it is solid. Whisk thoroughly to completely incorporate the brown butter.

Strain the base through a fine-mesh strainer and cool over an ice bath. Once it has come to room temperature, transfer to a clean bowl, place a piece of plastic wrap directly on the surface to prevent a skim from forming, and refrigerate overnight. 

Once the base has aged, strain again through a fine-mesh strainer. Churn to the ice cream according to the manufacturers instructions.

Place into a pre-chilled container and place a piece of plastic wrap directly on the surface to prevent freezer burn. Freeze until hard, at least 2 hours. 


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