Milk Chocolate and Passion Fruit Marshmallows


I love marshmallows, but only in hot chocolate. And only if they're homemade. Okay, sometimes I make hot chocolate with a mix that has tiny little marshmallows already in it, but they're really small so it doesn't count. 

But seriously, homemade marshmallows are infinitely better than store bought and they're easy and don't even require a whole lot of ingredients! And you can customize the flavour to almost aaaanything.




Don't have passion fruit powder? Use another fruit powder or even leave it out! Don't have milk chocolate? Use dark! Don't have any chocolate at all (do people like that exist?), just make regular marshmallows! Add lemon zest, orange zest, any zest, jam, spices, extracts! Basically anything that packs a lot of flavour but doesn't have a lot of liquid can be added. So please don't add orange juice or a cup of coffee, that would be a bad idea. But orange zest and coffee powder, go for it! The possibilities are endless.




If you happen to have a handheld torch, this is the time to whip it out. Toasted marshmallow in your hot chocolate. Toasted homemade milk chocolate and passion fruit marshmallows in your hot chocolate. !!!!! 




Milk Chocolate and Passion Fruit Marshmallow Eggs
Recipe adapted from Bouchon Bakery

9.6 g silver leaf gelatin sheets
87 g egg whites
225 g granulated sugar
112 g water
50 g light corn syrup
12 g passion fruit powder
100 g milk chocolate, chopped finely

50 g cornstarch
50 g icing sugar


Spray a 9 x 9 inch baking pan with non stick spray and line with parchment paper. Combine the cornstarch and icing sugar in a small bowl. Using a sieve, dust the parchment-lined baking pan with an even layer of the icing sugar and cornstarch mixture.

To start, soften the gelatin leaf in ice water. Remove the gelatin from the water and squeeze out excess water. Place the gelatin in a small metal bowl set over a pot of simmering water and melt it (do not let it simmer), then reduce the heat and keep it warm.

Meanwhile, place the egg whites in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Place the milk chocolate in a bowl set over a pot of simmering water and melt it, then remove from heat.

Combine the granulated sugar, corn syrup, and water in a large saucepan and bring to a simmer over medium-high heat, stirring to dissolve the sugar, then simmer for about 5 minutes, until the syrup reaches 121.1 C/ 250 F.

Letting the syrup continue to cook, turn the mixer to medium speed. The goal is to have the egg whites at medium peaks when the syrup reaches 138-140 C/ 281-284 F. Should the hits reach stiff peaks before the syrup reaches the proper temperature, reduce the mixer speed to the lowest setting.

When the syrup reaches 138-140 C/ 281-284 F, remove it from the heat. Turn the mixer to medium speed and slowly add the syrup to the egg whites, pouring it between the side of the bowl and the whisk. Pour in the gelatin, increase the speed to medium-high, and mix for about 5 minutes, until the mixture is thickened, glossy, and warm but not hot.

Add the passion fruit powder and whip for 30 seconds to distribute. Gently fold in the melted chocolate. You can make swirled marshmallows by folding in the chocolate only a little bit or you can fold it in completely for an even look.

Spread the marshmallow mixture into the prepared pan. Spray a small offset spatula with non stick spray and use that to smooth the surface. If you want an even and flat surface, cut a 9 x 9 square of parchment and spray one side. Place the sprayed side down on the surface on the marshmallow and gently press down.

Let the marshmallows set at room temperature for 8 hours or preferably overnight. 

To cut up, remove the square of parchment off the top and lift out the marshmallow by using the parchment on the bottom. Using a sharp knife sprayed with non stick spray, trim the sides and then cut the marshmallows into your desired sizes/shapes. I find 1 x 1 inch works best. If you are storing them for more than a day, dust the cubes with the icing sugar-cornstarch mixture to prevent them from sticking to each other. Store in an airtight container at room temperature.

Hazelnut Mousse with Caramelized Hazelnuts


Caramel and nuts (along with warm spices) are the flavours of fall and winter to me. Warm, comforting, earthy, and cozy flavours that evoke thoughts of thick sweaters, scarves, and steaming mugs of tea. The berries that packed a punch of flavour and brightness have come and gone with the warm, sunny days and nuts, caramel, apples, pears, and chocolate take a front seat to comfort you on a rainy afternoon. Hazelnuts appear fairly often on the blog in the colder months because they're one of my favourite flavours, no chocolate needed.





I've said it before many times, but I'm a winter girl. Summer is nice, but I am much happier wearing sweaters and scarves and drinking multiple mugs of tea in a day. I don't mind the rain at all (I grew up here in Vancouver - or Raincouver as we affectionately call it) and while the dark can be kind of gloomy, it makes it easier to go to bed at 7pm and wake up at 4am for work.



Another pro to the colder months is that you can turn the oven on without feeling like your kitchen has become one of the seven circles of hell. In fact, you'll most likely want to turn on your oven so you can have that comforting warmth and aroma of whatever it is you're cooking. A huge reason as to why I make my own hot apple cider is so that my apartment can smell like apples and warm spices for a day. Sometimes I open the door of my balcony so my apartment can be cold enough for me to warrant 5 hours of oven time (i.e. making a stew or baking bread).


While this recipe doesn't call for too much oven time, it does give back with the wonderful smell of roasting hazelnuts. You'll be hanging around the stove while you stir the caramelizing hazelnuts but once again, it'll be worth it for the smell. A bit of patience is required for the mousse to set, but all that waiting and stirring and roasting will be rewarded with a celebration of hazelnuts and caramel that will make you wonder why hazelnut butter isn't the new peanut butter.


Hazelnut Mousse with Caramelized Hazelnuts

Caramelized Hazelnuts

375 g hazelnuts
140 g granulated sugar
45 g water

Praline Paste

100 g caramelized hazelnuts


Hazelnut Mousse

161 g heavy cream
161 g whole milk
60 g praline paste
101 g yolks
30 g sugar
3 g gelatin sheets
322 g heavy cream


First, make the caramelized hazelnuts. Preheat the oven to 350 F. Place the hazelnut on a parchment lined sheet pan and roast until golden brown and fragrant, about 10 minutes, stirring every few minutes. The hazelnuts need to be warm and de-skinned when they are added to the caramel.

While the hazelnuts are roasting, combine the sugar and water in a saucepan and place over low heat to dissolve the sugar. Increase the heat to high and cook the syrup to 116 C. Add the warm hazelnuts now and stir to coat them evenly. Continue cooking the hazelnuts and syrup until they are a deep amber colour and no sandy white bits remain. Spread onto a silpat lined baking sheet to cool completely. Roughly chop around 150 g of hazelnuts into pieces the size of sunflower seeds. Reserve in an airtight container at room temperature until ready to use.

For the praline paste, put 100 g of caramelized hazelnut in a small food processor or vitamix. Blend until a smooth and liquidy paste forms, about 8 to 12 minutes.

For the mousse, combine the yolks and sugar in a small bowl and whisk until slightly paler in colour. Place the gelatin sheets in ice water to soften.

Place the cream, milk, and praline paste in a medium saucepan, set over medium heat, and stir to disperse the praline paste. When the milk is just below a simmer, remove the pan from the heat and, whisking constantly, pour it into the yolk mixture. Return the mixture to the pan and place over medium heat. Stirring constantly with a rubber spatula, bring to a gentle simmer and simmer for 1 minute, lowering the heat if necessary to prevent the mixture from curdling. It should be very thick. 

Remove from the heat and strain through a fine-mesh sieve into a clean bowl. Squeeze the excess water from the gelatin and add to the custard. Cool down to 24 C.

While the custard is cooling, whip the 322 g of cream to medium peaks. Reserve in the fridge until the custard is the right temperature.

When the custard had reached 24 C, gently fold in one-third of the cream into the custard. Fold in the remaining cream. 

Pour the custard into your desired glasses to the halfway point, then add a layer of chopped hazelnuts. Fill the glasses with more mousse. Refrigerate until set, about 3 hours.

To serve, garnish with whole and chopped caramelized hazelnuts.

Vanilla Bean Caramels


Just a quick little post because it's Christmas Eve and I am exhausted after a veeery long day! 

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays to everyone, I hope you get to spend some time with your loved ones and can enjoy a bit of down time! I'll be taking a week or two off from blogging to catch my breath from work and get refreshed for another year of baking! 







Vanilla Bean Caramels

125 g heavy cream
55 g honey
260 g granulated sugar
1 vanilla bean
15 g unsalted butter
2 g fleur de sel


Combine the heavy cream, honey, and sugar in a large saucepan. Scrape the seeds from the vanilla bean and add to the cream mixture. Dissolve the sugar over low heat, then increase to high, stirring constantly to prevent the bottom from burning.

Cook the mixture to 124 C (255 F), then remove from heat and add the butter. Wait for the bubble to subside and then carefully pour into 1 inch diameter demi sphere molds or a baking pan lined with greased parchment paper.

Let the caramels cool and set for several hours. For easier wrapping, the caramels can be refrigerated until firm. They will be harder and less chewy but will go back to soft and chewy at room temperature.

Marshmallow Wreaths


I'm not normally one to make decorative edible things just for the sake of having them look cute. I like to be able to eat the things and have them taste great, not just look kind of cute. Like the cookies that you use as tree ornaments?? I mean, wouldn't that attract flies or ants? And why not just buy regular ornaments? I never understood that.

But these marshmallow wreaths are both super cute and deliciously edible!  



The great thing about marshmallows is that they last quite a while if kept in an airtight container at room temperature. You can give them as little gifts to those people that you don't know super well but you feel like you have to give them something. Instead of a Starbucks gift card or a box of pharmacy chocolates, make these! And the recipe makes lots of marshmallows so you'll definitely have some leftover for yourself.



These marshmallows can be flavoured with quite a few different things if you wish! I used good ol' vanilla bean because I love the classics. But why not add some spices? Cinnamon would be great, or maybe a blend of cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice, ginger, and cloves for a gingerbread-y marshmallow! Lemon or orange zest can be added easily as well. Perhaps an orange and clove marshmallow? Instant coffee powder, peppermint extract, whatever you want! 

Anything that is powdery in texture can be great. Just don't go adding any liquids or that can really mess up your marshmallows.



Marshmallow Wreaths

15 g gelatin sheets, bloomed
278 g sugar
93 g water 
70 g light corn syrup
110 g egg whites
1/2 vanilla bean (optional)

100 g cornstarch
100 g icing sugar


Place the egg whites in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment.

Place the sugar, water, and corn syrup in a saucepan. Dissolve the sugar over medium-low heat, then increase the heat to high. When the sugar has reached 120 C/248 F, slowly begin whipping the egg whites. 

When the sugar has reached 140 C/ 285 F, slowly pour into the whipping egg whites, making sure to pour the syrup between the bowl and the whip.

Using the residual heat from the saucepan, melt the bloomed gelatin. Pour into the egg whites.

Increase the speed to high and whip until the marshmallow mixture is fluffy and glossy, but still warm. Scrape the seeds from the vanilla bean (if using) and add to the mixture, whipping to distribute the seeds. 

Combine the cornstarch and icing sugar. Generously dust two silpat or parchment lined baking sheets with the mixture.

Transfer to a piping bag fitted with a small circular tip. Pipe even strands running the length of the baking sheet. Pipe as many as you can without each strand touching the other. Dust with more of the icing sugar-cornstarch mixture. Let it set overnight, or 12 hours.

Using a pair of scissors, cut each strand into 3 to 4 inch pieces. Gently press the ends of each strand together to form a circle. On a 30 degree angle, cut almost through the strand to create the "leaves". 

If desired, tie a ribbon or string around the seam of the two ends of the marshmallow to add a decorative touch and to also hide the seam. 

Raspberry Marshmallow Eggs


To me, Easter is one of those holidays purely for kids. When I was a kid, I loved it. We would have Easter egg hunts in our back yard with little brightly painted baskets. Other kids that I don't think I even knew would come over and join the hunt. There are photos of me as a kid wearing a little polka dot dress and my face painted like a bunny, it was adorable.

But, seeing as my family is not religious, once my brother and I got older, we just stopped celebrating Easter. We would still get a little bit of chocolate on Easter, but that was it really. No more hunts. That's okay, I'm a 21 year old adult now who has bills to pay and things to do and people to see. But I still like getting a little craftsy around the fun kid holidays like Easter.


I will also admit that I am not a fan of marshmallow outside of hot chocolate or s'mores. These are different, though. Have you ever used raspberry powder? It's a bit of a tough thing to find, but some speciality cooking/baking stores might have it. If you live in the States, you can order it online from lots of different places.

That stuff is strong, man. It gives such an intense raspberry flavour without adding any liquid and without the hassle of pureeing and straining raspberries. There's no need to worry about what's in it - it's just raspberries. Straight up raspberries, freeze dried, and then ground into a powder. I've also seen other berry powders, as well as pineapple and green apple powder! What a time to be alive.


That means you can add it to a regular marshmallow mixture without worrying about the texture or setting properties. No worries! And the flavour! None of that fake candy raspberry taste, this is as pure as you can get. 




But most importantly, look how cute these little guys are! Adorable little pink baby eggs made out of soft and squishy marshmallows! So cute! I'm not usually one to freak out over these kinds of things, but I can't help it this time.

If you want to make a variety of these eggs, the recipe can be modified to make lemon or vanilla marshmallow eggs! You could make all three flavours and have a beautiful assortment of flavours and colours of little marshmallow eggs.



Raspberry Marshmallow Eggs
Recipe from Bouchon Bakery

9.6 g silver leaf gelatin
87 g egg white
225 g granulated sugar
112 g water
50 g light corn syrup
12 g raspberry powder
red food colouring (optional)

Sanding sugar for finishing

Lemon variation
Omit the raspberry powder and instead use the zest of 2 lemons

Vanilla variation
Omit the raspberry powder and instead use the seeds from half a vanilla bean


First of all, you will need plastic two-piece eggs in whatever size you wish to use. With the size that I used, I managed to get 36 marshmallow eggs out of this recipe. Buy more eggs than you need, just in case.

To start, soften the gelatin leaf in ice water.

If the plastic eggs are new, open them, wash them, and dry them thoroughly. Spray the inside of both halves with non stick spray and set them in an egg carton.

Remove the gelatin from the water and squeeze out excess water. Place the gelatin in a small metal bowl set over a pot of simmering water and melt it (do not let it simmer), then reduce the heat and keep it warm.

Meanwhile, place the egg whites in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. 

Combine the granulated sugar, corn syrup, and water in a large saucepan and bring to a simmer over medium-high heat, stirring to dissolve the sugar, then simmer for about 5 minutes, until the syrup reaches 121.1 C/ 250 F.

Letting the syrup continue to cook, turn the mixer to medium speed. The goal is to have the egg whites at medium peaks when the syrup reaches 138-140 C/ 281-284 F. Should the hits reach stiff peaks before the syrup reaches the proper temperature, reduce the mixer speed to the lowest setting.

When the syrup reaches 138-140 C/ 281-284 F, remove it from the heat. Turn the mixer to medium speed and slowly add the syrup to the egg whites, pouring it between the side of the bowl and the whisk. Pour in the gelatine, increase the speed to medium-high, and mix for about 5 minutes, until the mixture is thickened, glossy, and warm but not hot.

If using, add a few drops of red food colouring and mix to combine. For the raspberry marshmallows, add the raspberry powder and gently whisk in to combine. For the lemon variation, gently whisk in the lemon zest and yellow food colouring. For the vanilla variation, gently whisk in the seeds of half a vanilla bean.

Fit a pastry bag with a 1/2 inch tip. Fill the pastry bag with the warm marshmallow mixture. Holding the tip close to the bottom of an egg half, slowly pull up as you fill the half completely; try not to leave any air pockets. Fill the other half and fit the top and bottom together - there will be some resistance, but they must be secure to form a perfect egg. Wipe off the excess marshmallow that oozes from the egg with a damp paper towel. Repeat with the remaining eggs. Stand the filled eggs in the egg carton and let them sit at room temperature overnight.

Put the sanding sugar in a small bowl. Remove the eggs from the holds. Toss the eggs in the sugar and then stand them in the egg carton. If they will be served within a few hours, let the eggs stand at room temperature. For longer storage, place the egg carton in a covered container for up to 2 weeks.

Enjoy!

Chocolate Caramels with Sea Salt


Everyone getting ready for New Years Eve? Picked out your dress, got your booze, got all these parties to go to? Yeah?? 

Well, not for me. I'm going to stay at home by myself and probably read over my new baking books (again) and maybe fiddle around with my new light setup. Exciting, I know.


This is also the time of year when everyone makes resolutions. 'Eat healthier!' and 'Exercise more!' and 'Be happier!', as if it was just as easy as that. Not to generalize, but most of these don't make it past January. Those kinds of things aren't something you just suddenly do, it's a lifestyle change. Everything in moderation, folks. 

Okay, you want to eat healthier, go for it, but you also have to take into account your mental health. Are you going to be happy eating brown rice and spinach for every meal? Or never going out to restaurants? I've witnessed this and they certainly were not a happy camper.



The things I make on this blog are indulgences. And you should do exactly that - indulge. But it's not indulging if you have it everyday. That what makes desserts and sweets special, you don't have something like this every single day. It's okay to treat yourself - heck, you deserve it! Don't feel guilty about eating something, that just ruins the whole point of eating it in the first place. Food is meant to be enjoyed and savoured. 

I'm just putting this out there because I know pinterest is just exploding with new workout routines, super healthy detox smoothie recipes, and those text-over-pictures with inspirational quotes about being a better you. You don't have to make a resolution. Or, if you do, it doesn't have to be the same old 'Be healthier, happier, spontaneous, blah blah blah'. 

How about something like, "Try to be a little bit nicer to the cashier at the supermarket" or "Be patient with the slow driver ahead of you who has their blinker on but obviously isn't turning" or even "Don't have a tantrum when the thing you spent all day baking came out wrong" (that one's for me). And then, maybe every month or week or whatever you want, have a new one. Baby steps, my friends.

Everything in moderation. 

Except maybe these bad boys.


Happy New Year, everybody.

Chocolate Caramels with Sea Salt

1 1/4 cup (302 g) heavy cream
2 cups (454 g) unsalted butter
2 cups (400 g) sugar
5 oz. (141 g) good quality dark chocolate, chopped finely
1 teaspoon sea salt

Butter an 8 inch square pan. Set aside.

In a saucepan, heat the cream and butter until melted, set aside.

In a large saucepan over medium heat, combine the sugar and just enough water to make a paste. Heat to 300 F (148 C), then slowly add the melted butter and cream. It will bubble up, be careful.

Bring the temperature back up to 260 F (126 C). Add the chocolate and stir to emulsify. Pour the mixture into the pan. Let cool, sprinkle with sea salt, and cut into squares.

Hazelnut Brittle


Another quick, easy, and super tasty stocking stuffer! You can add whatever nuts or seeds you want to this recipe, just keep it all within the weight limits. This makes a good-sized batch, so if you're only making it for one person, go with half of a recipe. 


I'm gearing up for Christmas dinners so there might be a couple blog posts coming at you real quick. There might be two in one day! I know, I post two recipes in three months and now I'm posting all the time. I'm making up for lost time, you guys! I've missed baking at home. 

Hazelnut Brittle

340 g granulated sugar
120 mL water
115 g liquid glucose or light corn syrup
225 g butter, softened, cut into pieces
2.5 g salt
2.5 g baking soda
250 g hazelnuts (or other nuts and/or seeds)


Preheat the oven to 350 F. Toast the hazelnuts for 5 to 8 minutes, until fragrant. Remove the skins with your hands or a kitchen towel. Roughly chop them.

Put a silpat on a flat baking sheet and set aside.

Combine the sugar, water, and glucose/corn syrup in a medium saucepan and turn on low heat. Slowly dissolve the sugar without stirring and trying not to get the mixture on the sides of the pot. Once all the sugar has been dissolved, increase the heat to medium-high.

Once the mixture has reached 122 C/251 F, add the butter, baking soda, and salt. Whisking often, melt the butter and cook the mixture to a deep caramel colour. It may smoke a little bit even though it isn't burnt, so don't worry. 

Once the mixture has caramelized, add the hazelnuts and use a spatula to fold them in quickly. Take it off the heat and pour it onto your silpat-lined baking sheet. Working quickly, spread the brittle in an even layer. It will set very quickly so try to work as fast as possible.

Let it cool and set for at least an hour. Break into chunks and enjoy!

Peppermint and Chocolate Swirl Marshmallows


When I was a kid, my brother told me that marshmallows were made out of ground up hooves, horns, tails, and bones of cows and pigs. I hardly ever ate marshmallows as a kid, to no surprise. To be honest, I never bothered to actually look up what marshmallows were made of or how they were made until about 6 months ago. Embarrassing.


Once I realized that marshmallows were made up of gelatin and/or egg whites, plus a bunch of sugar, they didn't seem so bad. I know gelatin comes from animal bones, but it's much better than the idea of marshmallows I had when I was a kid. 



Marshmallows are pretty darn easy and they make great little gifts. Pop them in some clear bags, tie them up with pretty string and you've got a tasty treat for someone to enjoy with their hot chocolate or s'mores. 


Feel free to mess around with the flavours, too! I find the egg-less marshmallows (the chocolate ones in this case) are more versatile, but go ahead and experiment. Use mint chocolate instead of dark, use other natural extracts instead of peppermint, dust them in cinnamon and icing sugar, or spike them with some booze! There are lots of ways to make them into whatever flavour you want.


But what are marshmallows without hot chocolate? My next post will give you three different and delicious flavours that you can enjoy with your new homemade marshmallows.


Peppermint Marshmallows
Recipe adapted from David Lebovitz

17 g powder or sheet gelatin (2 packets or 8 to 10 sheets)
125 mL water + 80 mL water
1 cup (200 g) sugar
1/3 cup (100 g) corn syrup
4 large (110 g) egg whites 
pinch of salt
1/2 vanilla bean
1/4 teaspoon peppermint extract
1-2 drops red food colouring (optional)

1 cup cornstarch
1 cup powdered sugar

If using powder gelatin, sprinkle the gelatin over 125 mL of cold water to dissolve and soften. If using sheets, soak them in about 500 mL of cold water.

Combine the cornstarch and icing sugar in a bowl. Dust a baking sheet or brownie pan completely with this mixture, making sure there are no bare spots. Set aside.

In a small saucepan, combine the sugar, corn syrup, and 80 mL of water. Place over medium-low heat to dissolve the sugar.

Pour the egg whites in the bowl of an electric mixer and beat on low speed until frothy. Add the pinch of salt.

Once the sugar has dissolved, increase the heat to high. When the sugar syrup reaches 100 degrees C (210 F), increase the speed of the mixer to high until the egg whites are thick and fluffy.

When the syrup reaches 118 C (248 F), slowly pour the syrup into the mixer, trying to get it between the bowl and the whip so it does not touch the whip. 

Scrape the powdered gelatin and water into the saucepan that you used for your sugar or put the sheets about 2 tablespoons of water into the saucepan. Let the residual heat melt the gelatin, then add to the egg whites. 

Whip the mixture for about 5 minutes until it has cooled down, then add the seeds from half of a vanilla bean and the peppermint extract. Whip for a minute to distribute everything. 

Put in the food colouring and give it a couple folds to create a swirl pattern. Pour the marshmallows onto the prepared sheet or brownie pan and smooth the surface.

Allow the marshmallows to dry for 4 hours or preferably overnight. When you wish you cut them, dust your knife or scissors with the cornstarch and icing sugar mixture and cut into your desired shapes. Once you have cut them, place them in a bowl with some of the cornstarch and icing sugar and toss to coat them evenly. 


Chocolate Swirl Marshmallows
Recipe adapted from Food52

70 g (2.5 oz) dark chocolate
1 cup (250 mL) water, divided
25.5 g powdered gelatin (3 packets)
1 1/2 cup (287 g) granulated sugar
1 cup (350 g) light corn syrup
pinch of salt
1/2 vanilla bean

1 cup icing sugar
1 tablespoon cocoa powder


Grease your desired pan or sheet with non-stick spray and set aside.

Chop your chocolate into very fine pieces with a knife or use a food processor. The pieces should be about the size of cornmeal.

Put half of the water in the bowl of your electric mixer and sprinkle the gelatin over. Pour the other half into a saucepan with the sugar and corn syrup. Dissolve the sugar over low heat, then increase the heat to high. Bring the syrup up to 115 C (240 F). Remove from the heat and let it sit for one minute.

Turn on the mixer to medium and slowly pour the syrup into the mixer, trying to get it between the bowl and the whip so it does not touch the whip. Beat for 10 to 12 minutes until the mixture is very white and thick. Add the seeds from half a vanilla bean and mix for 30 seconds. Add the finely chopped chocolate and give it a few folds to create a swirl pattern. There maybe be some unmelted pieces at this time but they should melt before the marshmallows cool.

Pour the marshmallows into your prepared pan or sheet and smooth the surface. Let the marshmallows dry for 4 hours or preferably overnight.

Cut your marshmallows into desired shapes. Combine the icing sugar and cocoa and toss with the marshmallows.