Chocolate Brioche Wreaths


I know that I sometimes post some pretty complicated and difficult desserts on this blog. I work as a pastry cook, so making a 4 component dessert at home is pretty straight forward for me. Things that can sometimes scare a home baker, like making caramel or tempering chocolate, are as easy as can be for me. I don't mean to brag, but I'm trying to say that I know the stuff I put on here is not always easy for everyone to make.

Except these. These are easy for everyone to make.




I mean, yeah, you need a stand mixer to mix the brioche so if you don't have a stand mixer then I don't think you can make this (sorry!) but them's the brakes. Other than that, it's super easy! You mix up the brioche, let it rise, chuck it in the fridge overnight, then roll them out, roll 'em up, cut 'em, proof 'em, bake 'em. 

Easy, right? I don't even know what's easy to other people anymore. Once you make 70 kg of almond cream, line 100 tart rings, or roll out 200 croissants on a daily basis, "easy" takes on a new meaning. 






These look complicated - with all the layers and the "braiding" and the dark/light contrast, but in reality they're just logs of rolled up dough that have been cut in half. There's no laminating or complicated braiding techniques here, I promise. But there's no need to tell that to everyone else. You can just let them think you're a dough whisperer, a master of all things kneaded and baked.



These brioche are best served the day they're made (preferably warm from the oven!), but they are also pretty good the next day. I like to tear off chunks and dip them in hot chocolate or warm milk, but that might be a bit too decadent for a normal person to handle. But I recommend it because it's delicious



Chocolate Brioche Wreaths

Brioche
Recipe from Bouchon Bakery Cookbook

372 g all-purpose flour
8 g instant yeast
44 g granulated sugar
9 g fine sea salt
186 g eggs
63 g whole milk
167 g unsalted butter, at room temperature, cut into 1/8th inch dice

Chocolate Filling

60 g unsalted butter, at room temperature
30 g granulated sugar
30 g alkalized cocoa powder
2 g vanilla powder
10 g honey


Spray a large bowl with nonstick spray.

For the brioche, place the flour and yeast in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook and mix for about 15 seconds to distribute the yeast evenly. Add all of the remaining dough ingredients except for the butter and mix on low speed for 4 minutes. Add the butter a few pieces at a time, incorporating after each addition before adding the next. Stop and scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl and push the dough off the hook. Mix for a total of 30 minutes on low speed.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface. Fold the left side over to the right, the right over to the left, then the top to the bottom and the bottom to the top so you have a "package" with the seam at the top. Place the dough seam-side down in the prepared bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and let it ferment for 1 hour. 

Repeat the folding process, place it back in the bowl, cover, and refrigerate overnight.

For the filling, cream the butter until pale and creamy. Add the sugar and beat until light and fluffy. Add the cocoa powder and vanilla powder and mix until incorporated, then add the honey and mix until incorporated.

Remove the brioche from the refrigerator and divide it into four equal pieces. Work with one piece of dough at a time while keeping the rest in the refrigerator.

On a lightly floured work surface, roll out one piece of dough to 40 cm by 20 cm. If the dough becomes too warm at any point, gently place it on the back of a sheet pan lined with parchment and refrigerate for 10 minutes, then continue working.

Spread one quarter of the filling onto the brioche using an offset spatula, reaching all the way to the edges but leaving 2 cm of dough bare on one of the long sides. Brush the bare part with water. Starting from the other long side, roll up the dough tightly and evenly. Once the dough is rolled up, gently roll the log until it is 50 cm in length, being careful not to squish or deform the dough. Cut each 50 cm log into two 25 cm logs.

Using a large knife, make a cut in the dough log, leaving 3 cm at the top uncut. Place the right half of dough over the left, then repeat until you have a "braid" of dough. Gently brush a bit of water onto the ends of the dough and press them together, then place on a parchment lined baking sheet. Repeat with the remaining doughs. You should have 8 total wreaths.

Place a piece of plastic wrap lightly on the surface of the brioche and let it proof in a warmish place for 1 1/2 to 2 hours. (Note: I turn the shower on in my bathroom, let it run for 5 minutes, then turn it off. This makes the bathroom a little warm and a little steamy, but not too hot. I place the brioche on the counter, then close the door. This provides the most ideal proofing conditions that I can find in my apartment. If you do this, check up on the dough every 30 minutes to make sure it's not too hot!)

Preheat the oven to 330 F. Brush the brioche with egg wash, being careful not to drag any of the filling onto the brioche when you do, and bake until golden brown, abut 20 to 25 minutes. 

Remove from the oven and let cool completely. Enjoy!

Brown Butter and Peach Brioche Bun


I always have a hard time thinking of something to make with peaches because to me, peaches are best enjoyed exactly as they are. I'm talking fresh as can be, juice dripping down your wrist as you bite and slurp at the soft flesh, and sucking on the pit to get every last bit of deliciousness that you can. That is how I want to eat my peaches, 9 times out of 10.

But sometimes, I do want to do a bit more with them. You don't want to mess with them too much or you lose that delicate texture and flavour. 



With these brioche, I keep it simple and classic. Brown butter and peaches are a great combo and brioche and pastry cream are a great combo, so it makes sense to put them all together. It's not too complicated or fancy, but it's still damn tasty.



Feel free to use any other stone fruits - apricots, plums, cherries, or a combination of them! Stone fruits hold up nicer than berries when baked in this way and don't leak a lot of juice (which would make the brioche soggy). So get creative!




Brown Butter and Peach Brioche Bun

Brioche

263 g all-purpose flour
6 g instant yeast
31 g granulated sugar
6 g fine sea salt
132 g eggs
44 g whole milk
118 g unsalted butter, at room temperature, cut into 1/2-inch cubes


Brown Butter Pastry Cream
Recipe from The Modern Café

216 g whole milk
82 g sugar
2 g salt
1/2 vanilla bean
110 g yolks
32 g cornstarch
32 g brown butter, warm

Egg wash
Coarse sugar
Fresh peaches, sliced 1/4 inch thick
Icing sugar


For the brioche, place the flour and yeast in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook and mix for about 15 seconds to distribute the yeast evenly. Add all the remaining dough ingredients, except the butter, and mix on low speed for 4 minutes. Continue to mix on low speed for 30 minutes. (At this point there will be some dough sticking to the sides of the bowl). Add the butter a few pieces at a time, incorporating after each addition before adding the next. Stop and scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl and push the dough off the hook. Continue to mix for 10 minutes.

Using a bowl scraper, release the dough and turn it out onto a lightly floured work board: the dough will be sticky. Stretch and fold the left side over to the centre, then the right over to the centre. Repeat with the top and bottom. Place seam side down in a lightly oiled bowl, cover, and set aside for 1 hour to ferment.

Refrigerate the dough for at least an hour, or preferably overnight. Remove the dough from the fridge and turn it out onto a lightly floured surface. Divide the dough into 85 g balls and round each one out. Place seam side down on a silpat lined baking sheet and cover loosely with plastic wrap. Set aside in a warm place to proof for 1 to 1 1/2 hours.

Meanwhile, make the pastry cream,place the milk in a saucepan. Scrape the seeds from the vanilla bean and add to the cream. Place over medium heat.

Combine the egg yolks, sugar, salt, and cornstarch in a medium bowl. Whisk until slightly paler in colour.

When the milk mixture has come to a boil, slowly pour a small amount into the yolk mixture, whisking continuously. Continue tempering the yolks with the milk mixture, then transfer all of back into the saucepan. Cook over medium-low heat, whisking continuously, until the mixture has thickened, about 4 minutes. Continue to cook for another minute, then strain through a fine-mesh sieve into a clean bowl. Add the brown butter and stir to combine. Set the pastry cream over an ice bath to cool. Once it has reached room temperature, place a piece of plastic wrap directly on the surface to prevent a skin from forming and refrigerate for 1 hour.

Preheat the oven to 325 F. When the dough has proofed, brush the surface with egg wash and liberally sprinkle with coarse sugar. Using damp fingers, push the dough down in the centre to create a well, being careful not to damage the dough too much. Pipe in the pastry cream and top with peach slices. Sprinkle a bit of coarse sugar over the peaches.

Bake for 15 to 20 minutes, until the brioche is a deep golden brown colour. Remove from the oven and let cool completely. Dust with icing sugar immediately before serving.



Tomato Bruschetta on Homemade Bread


You know those recipes that aren't really recipes? This is one of them. I'm pretty sure there's a million "recipes" for bruschetta out there with different ratios of tomatoes to basil, but this is just my version. Nothing too fancy, just good homemade bread, ripe tomatoes, and fresh basil. This is my absolute favourite way to enjoy tomatoes - no cooking, no fussing, no worries. 



I've teamed up with Produce Candles again this month (check out last months collab, Passion fruit and mint sorbet). The scent for June is Tomato! And what a perfect scent for that spring-summer transition. Shorts are becoming an every day thing, sunscreen is being put on, and summer produce is hitting the farmers markets. While the first thing that you think of when you think of summer might not be to turn the oven to 450 F for two hours to make bread, it's worth it. There's nothing quite like a thick slice of homemade bread, toasted (or grilled!) to crunchy perfection, then topped with fresh and juicy tomatoes, herbs, and drizzled with olive oil. 


When I was a kid, my dad had a pretty big veggie garden in our backyard. He grew green beans, peas, carrots, strawberries, potatoes, broccoli, and tomatoes. I was never a big vegetable eating kid (are there such things?) but I liked eating veggies that we grew. And by we, I mean I helped dig up potatoes and I think that's all I ever did in the garden. 


I remember the smell of the tomato vines so well. That fresh, herbaceous, almost spicy scent that stuck to your hands when you picked the tomatoes. It stuck to your hands for hours afterwards. To me, that smell reminds me of summer afternoons spent playing in the backyard and helping my dad dig up potatoes and finding slugs on our strawberry plant (that wasn't very fun, actually). 

While I don't have my own tomato plant, I can still relish in the summery scent of the tomato candle and enjoy the fresh tomatoes on bread that came out of my own oven.



Overnight White Bread

900 g all-purpose flour
100 g whole wheat flour
780 g water, 90 to 95 F/ 32 to 35 C
22 g fine sea salt
0.8 g instant dried yeast

Bruschetta

2 thick slices of bread
1 garlic clove
3 ripe tomatoes
sprig of fresh basil
drizzle of olive oil
salt and pepper to taste


For the bread, combine the flours with 780 g of water in a 12 quart (or equivalent) tub. Mix by hand until just incorporated. Cover and let rest for 20 to 30 minutes.

Sprinkle the 22 g of salt and the 0.8 g of yeast evenly over the top of the dough. Mix by hand, wetting your working hand before mixing so the dough doesn't stick to you. Reach underneath the dough and grab about one-quarter of the dough and gently stretch and fold it over the top to the other side. Repeat three more time with the remaining dough, until the salt and yeast are fully enclosed.

Use the pincer method (described in the 80% Biga Bread) to fully integrate the ingredients. Fold the dough over itself a few times, then repeat, alternately cutting and folding until all the ingredients are fully integrated and the dough has some tension in it. Let the dough rest for a few minutes, then fold for another 30 seconds or until the dough tightens up. The target dough temperature at the end of the mix is 77 to 78 F/ 25 to 26 C. Cover the tub and let the dough rise for 12 to 14 hours.

The dough needs two or three folds, preferably within the first hour and a half after mixing. This is best for maximum gas retention and volume in the finished loaf.

In the morning, moderately flour a work surface about 2 feet wide. Flour your hands and sprinkle a bit of flour around the edges of the tub. Tip the tub slightly and gently work your floured hand beneath the dough to loosen it form the bottom of the tub. Gently ease the dough out onto the work surface without pulling or tearing it.

With floured hands, pick up the dough and ease it back down onto the work surface in a somewhat even shape. Dust the area in the middle where you'll cut the dough with a bit of flour. Cut the dough into 2 equal size pieces.

Dust two proofing baskets (or equivalent) with flour. Shape each piece of dough into a medium-tight ball (described in the 80% Biga Bread). Place each seam side down in its proofing basket. Lightly flour the tops of the loaves, set them side by side, and cover them with a kitchen towel. 

Let them proof for about 1 1/4 hours, assuming your kitchen temperature is around 70 F/21 C. If your kitchen is warmer, the loaves will proof faster. Preheat the oven at this time, 475 F. Place your Dutch Oven on the middle rack with the lid on while the oven is preheating.

Use the finger dent test (in my basic bread dough recipe) to test if the loaves are proofed. If you only have one Dutch oven, put the second loaf in the fridge 20 minutes before you bake the first one.

Be very careful with the extremely hot dutch oven in this next step. Invert the proofed loaf onto a lightly floured countertop, keeping in mind that the top of the loaf will the side that was facing down while it was rising - the seam side. Remove the preheated Dutch oven from the oven, remove the lid, and carefully place the loaf in the Dutch oven seam side up. Cover and bake for 30 minutes, then remove the lid and continue to bake for a further 20 to 30 minutes, until at least medium dark brown around all the loaf. Check after 15 minutes of baking uncovered in case your oven runs hot.

Remove the Dutch oven and carefully tilt it to turn the loaf out. Place on a wire rack to let it cool, about 20 minutes. Put the Dutch oven back in the oven for 5 minutes to preheat it, then bake the second loaf in the same way.

For the bruschetta, grill or toast your bread. Cut the garlic clove and rub the cut end on the warm toast. Dice the tomatoes and chiffonade the basil. Toss the tomatoes with the basil, drizzle with olive oil, and season with salt and pepper. Spoon onto the toast and garnish with a basil leaf.


Multigrain Seeded Bread


I think this may be the very first healthy recipe on this blog. I mean, this is a dessert blog so you better not be coming here looking for any healthy recipes in the first place, but it's nice to be surprised once in a while. This bread is a hearty loaf filled with all kinds of seeds and oats. There is a ton of texture in this bread, along with a nutty flavour from the toasted white sesame seeds. This bread would be wonderful alongside a big winter stew or topped with a fried egg or even just slathered with some good quality butter. 



I haven't shared a bread recipe in a while, but don't be fooled into thinking I've given up bread. I still bake a couple loaves every weekend, if I have the time. I usually slice one of the loaves up and pop it into the freezer so if I don't have time to make a new loaf on the weekend, I can still have great toast.



My dad was the one who bought the book that this bread is adapted from (Flour Water Salt Yeast) and that kick started my love for making bread at home. I try to bring fresh bread over to my dad's place whenever I go round for dinner, or at least give him a sample of any new breads that I make. His favourite bread that I've ever made used to be the Sage and Walnut Bread that I made using fresh sage from his garden, but I am happy to say that this seeded loaf has replaced it as his new favourite! While my favourite will always be the good ol' Overnight White Bread, it's nice to branch out sometimes and try something new for a change.



Multigrain Seeded Bread
Recipe adapted from Flour Water Salt Yeast

Soaker

60 g toasted white sesame seeds
60 g black sesame seeds
60 g quinoa
60 g flax seeds
60 g rolled oats
60 g steel cut oats
60 g sunflower seeds
60 g pumpkin seeds
500 g water

Dough

750 g all-purpose flour
50 g dark rye flour
200 g whole wheat flour
700 g water, 90 to 95 F/ 32 to 35 C
22 g fine sea salt
0.8 g instant dried yeast


Combine all the ingredients for the soaker in a large bowl and mix to combine. Cover with a kitchen towel and let sit at room temperature for an hour.

Combine the flours and water in a 12 quart (or equivalent) tub. Mix by hand until just incorporated. Cover and let rest for 20 to 30 minutes.

Sprinkle the 22 g of salt and the 0.8 g of yeast evenly over the top of the dough. Mix by hand, wetting your working hand before mixing so the dough doesn't stick to you. Reach underneath the dough and grab about one-quarter of the dough and gently stretch and fold it over the top to the other side. Repeat three more times with the remaining dough, until the salt and yeast are fully enclosed.

Use the pincer method (described in the 80% Biga Bread) to fully integrate the ingredients. Fold the dough over itself a few times, then repeat, alternately cutting and folding until all the ingredients are fully integrated and the dough has some tension in it. Let the dough rest for a few minutes. Add the soaker and then fold for another few minutes. The target dough temperature at the end of the mix is 77 to 78 F/ 25 to 26 C. Cover the tub and let the dough rise for 12 to 14 hours.

The dough needs two or three folds, preferably within the first hour and a half after mixing. This is best for maximum gas retention and volume in the finished loaf.

In the morning, moderately flour a work surface about 2 feet wide. Flour your hands and sprinkle a bit of flour around the edges of the tub. Tip the tub slightly and gently work your floured hand beneath the dough to loosen it form the bottom of the tub. Gently ease the dough out onto the work surface without pulling or tearing it.

With floured hands, pick up the dough and ease it back down onto the work surface in a somewhat even shape. Dust the area in the middle where you'll cut the dough with a bit of flour. Cut the dough into 2 equal size pieces.

Dust two proofing baskets (or equivalent) with flour. Shape each piece of dough into a medium-tight ball (described in the 80% Biga Bread). Place each seam side down in its proofing basket. Lightly flour the tops of the loaves, set them side by side, and cover them with a kitchen towel. 

Let them proof for about 1 1/4 hours, assuming your kitchen temperature is around 70 F/21 C. If your kitchen is warmer, the loaves will proof faster. Preheat the oven at this time, 475 F. Place your Dutch Oven on the middle rack with the lid on while the oven is preheating.

Use the finger dent test (in my basic bread dough recipe) to test if the loaves are proofed. If you only have one Dutch oven, put the second loaf in the fridge 20 minutes before you bake the first one.

Be very careful with the extremely hot dutch oven in this next step. Invert the proofed loaf onto a lightly floured countertop, keeping in mind that the top of the loaf will the side that was facing down while it was rising - the seam side. Remove the preheated Dutch oven from the oven, remove the lid, and carefully place the loaf in the Dutch oven seam side up. Cover and bake for 30 minutes, then remove the lid and continue to bake for a further 20 to 30 minutes, until at least medium dark brown around all the loaf. Check after 15 minutes of baking uncovered in case your oven runs hot.

Remove the Dutch oven and carefully tilt it to turn the loaf out. Place on a wire rack to let it cool, about 20 minutes. Put the Dutch oven back in the oven for 5 minutes to preheat it, then bake the second loaf in the same way.

Enjoy!



Brioche Doughnuts with Brown Butter Pastry Cream and Maple & Vanilla Bean Glaze


Sometimes, you just want a doughnut. And not just any doughnut. If you're going to eat fried dough, you might as well go big or go home. 

Use a dough with a ton of butter - brioche. 

And don't just make a regular pastry cream - add brown butter. 

And the pecans - more brown butter. Butter everywhere. 

When I say go big or go home, I mean it.




There are times when you just want to go over-the-top indulgent. You've thrown all common sense out the window and just decided, "Screw it, today is a fat day." Nothing in this recipe is at all healthy, not even remotely. Butter and sugar are everywhere. But really, did you expect a healthy doughnut when "brown butter" is in the title?



And these pecans. Oooohhh man, these pecans. I've been popping a few into my mouth every few hours. I've even put them in my morning granola. My logic is that my granola already has nuts in it so then I can add more nuts. Nuts that are covered in maple syrup and honey and brown butter.... There's actually no logic in that. I don't care. The milk left over at the bottom of the bowl is worth it.


Maybe today isn't going to be your fat day. Maybe today is your "I'm going to be an adult and go exercise and not sit on my butt all day reading pastry books". Maybe today is your "I'm going to eat this kale salad and like it."

But one day, you're going to have a fat day. And these doughnuts will be waiting.



Brioche Doughnuts with Brown Butter Pastry Cream and Maple & Vanilla Bean Glaze

Brioche
Recipe from The Modern Café

307 g bread flour
8 g salt
45 g sugar
4 g instant dry yeast
71 g whole milk, at room temperature
113 g eggs, at room temperature
154 g unsalted butter, at room temperature

Brown Butter Pastry Cream
Recipe from The Modern Café

108 g whole milk
41 g sugar
1 g salt
1/2 vanilla bean
55 g yolks
16 g cornstarch
16 g brown butter, warm

Maple and Vanilla Bean Glaze

175 g icing sugar
100 g good-quality maple syrup
1 vanilla bean

Maple Molasses Pecans
Recipe adapted from The Dahlia Bakery Cookbook

50 g honey
35 g maple syrup
7 g molasses
5 g vanilla extract
1 g salt
300 g whole pecans
25 g brown butter, warm



To make the brioche dough, combine the flour, salt, sugar, and yeast in a medium bowl.

In a stand mixer, pour in the milk and eggs and stir to combine. Pour the dry ingredients on top. Mix on low speed until just incorporated.

Add one-third of the butter and switch the mixer to medium speed. Once that butter has been incorporated, add another third of the butter. Wait until it has been completely mixed in, then add the remaining butter.

Continue to mix on medium speed until full gluten development is achieved. To check for gluten development, perform a "window test". Stretch a small amount of dough with your hands. It should be elastic enough to be pulled until it is very thin and you can see through it without it ripping.

At this point, the final dough temperature should not exceed 27 C/ 80 F.

Take the dough out of the bowl and place on a floured surface. Cover with plastic wrap. Allow it to ferment for 45 minutes.

Transfer the dough to a sheet pan lined with a silpat or greased parchment paper to prevent it from sticking. Wrap the sheet pan with plastic and refrigerate for at least an hour or up to 12 hours.

Lightly flour your work surface. Roll out the brioche to a thickness of 3/4 inch. Using a 4 inch circle cutter, cut the brioche and gently transfer the rounds to a parchment lined baking sheet with about 1 inch of space between them. Gather the scraps and reroll them once and cut as many circles as you can out. Discard the remaining scraps.

Lightly cover the brioche with plastic wrap and let the dough proof for 2 to 3 hours, until doubled in size.

Heat about 2 L of vegetable or canola oil in a very large saucepan or soup pot to 185 C. Once the oil has reached the correct temperature, start frying the doughnuts one or two at a time. Fry each side for about 1 1/2 minutes. Remove from the oil and let cool on a wire rack. 

For the brown butter pastry cream, place the milk in a saucepan. Scrape the seeds from the vanilla bean and add to the cream. Place over medium heat.

Combine the egg yolks, sugar, salt, and cornstarch in a medium bowl. Whisk until slightly paler in colour.

When the milk mixture has come to a boil, slowly pour a small amount into the yolk mixture, whisking continuously. Continue tempering the yolks with the milk mixture, then transfer all of back into the saucepan. Cook over medium-low heat, whisking continuously, until the mixture has thickened, about 4 minutes. Continue to cook for another minute, then strain through a fine-mesh sieve into a clean bowl. Add the brown butter and stir to combine. Set the pastry cream over an ice bath to cool. Once it has reached room temperature, place a piece of plastic wrap directly on the surface to prevent a skin from forming and refrigerate for 2 hours.

For the maple and vanilla bean glaze, place the icing sugar in a medium bowl. Add the maple syrup and stir to create a smooth glaze. Scrape the seeds from the vanilla bean and add to the glaze. 

For the maple molasses roasted pecans, preheat the oven to 375 F.

Combine the honey, maple syrup, molasses, vanilla extract, and salt in a bowl. Stir to combine. Add the pecans and stir to thoroughly coat the pecans. Spread evenly on a baking sheet lined with a parchment or silpat and bake for 10 to 12 minutes, stirring the nuts every few minutes. Remove from the oven and let cool completely. Transfer the nuts into a bowl and add the brown butter. 

To assemble the doughnuts, transfer the pastry cream to a piping bag fitted with a small circular tip. Poke a small hole in the side of the doughnut and insert the piping tip. Pipe the pastry cream into the doughnut until you feel a little bit of resistance. When you remove the piping tip, the pastry cream should come out a little.

Dip the doughnut in the maple glaze and let the excess drip off. Let the glaze set, then add a few pecans on top. Serve immediately.


Cinnamon Orange Sticky Buns


Riddle me this - is a sticky bun still a sticky bun when it has cinnamon in it? Or does it become a cinnamon bun? Is a sticky bun still a sticky bun if it has no pecans in it? Where does one draw the line between cinnamon and sticky bun? These are the important things we need to figure out.


In my personal opinion, a sticky bun is a sticky bun because of the glaze that sit in the bottom of the pan and gets all melty and gooey and sticky during baking. After baking, the bun is turned upside down and eaten. That is a sticky bun. Cinnamon buns, once again in my personal opinion, are baked and eaten right-side-up with no delicious glaze in the bottom of the pan (but there can be glaze on top).

However, I am no bun taxonomist and classifying the varieties of buns is not my day job. You can call these whatever you want. Heck, you can just call 'em "tasty", because that is definitely what they are. 


The filling and glaze is full of butter, brown sugar, honey, vanilla, cinnamon, and of course, orange! The warm and comforting taste of spices and brown sugar pairs wonderfully with the bright orange flavour, just like a sunny fall day. There's a nip in the air and the leaves are on the ground, but it's still a bright and beautiful day! Next to rainy afternoons spent indoors, those are the best kind of fall days. 

Those kinds of perfectly sunny but chilly fall days call for these sticky buns in the morning. You can make the brioche dough the night before, ferment it, then pop it in the fridge overnight. In the morning, whip up the glaze, roll out the brioche, proof it, bake it, and eat! The smell of cinnamon and orange (and butter and sugar) will get anyone out of bed. 



Cinnamon Orange Sticky Buns


Sticky Bun Glaze/Filling

135 g unsalted butter, at room temperature
100 g brown sugar
100 g granulated sugar
80 g honey
2 g vanilla paste
2 g salt
5 g ground cinnamon
zest from 2 large oranges

Brioche

268 g bread flour
6 g salt
40 g sugar
3 g instant dried yeast
62 g whole milk
106 g eggs
136 g unsalted butter, soft


For the glaze/filling, combine the butter and sugars in the bowl of a stand mixer and beat until light and fluffy. Add the honey, vanilla paste, salt, cinnamon, and orange zest. Beat until combined, scraping down the sides and bottom of the bowl. Set aside.

To make the brioche dough, combine the flour, salt, sugar, and yeast in a medium bowl.

In a stand mixer, pour in the milk, vanilla extract, the eggs and stir to combine. Pour the dry ingredients on top. Mix on low speed until just incorporated.

Add one-third of the butter and switch the mixer to medium speed. Once that butter has been incorporated, add another third of the butter. Wait until it has been completely mixed in, then add the remaining butter.

Continue to mix on medium speed until full gluten development is achieved. To check for gluten development, perform a "window test". Stretch a small amount of dough with your hands. It should be elastic enough to be pulled until it is very thin and you can see through it without it ripping.

At this point, the final dough temperature should not exceed 27 C/ 80 F.

Take the dough out of the bowl and place on a floured surface. Cover with plastic wrap. Allow it to ferment for 45 minutes.

Transfer the dough to a sheet pan lined with a silpat or greased parchment paper to prevent it from sticking. Wrap the sheet pan with plastic and refrigerate for at least an hour or up to 12 hours.

Roll out the dough to a 12 x 12 inch square. Reserve 130 g of the sticky bun glaze/filling and set aside. Spread the remaining glaze/filling onto the brioche, getting right to the edges. Tightly roll up the brioche. Using a sharp knife, cut into 1 inch thick segments. You may need to reshape them back into circles.

Grease a muffin tin with butter. Spread the reserved glaze/filling into each muffin cup, using about 1 teaspoon per cup. Place the sticky buns into the muffin tins.

Cover the muffin tin with plastic wrap and let proof for 45 minutes to 1 hour. 

Preheat the oven to 325 F. 

Brush the top of the buns with egg wash. Bake at 325 F for 15 minutes, then lower the temperature to 300 F and bake for a further 10 to 15 minutes. Let them cool slightly, then remove from the tin and cool them upside down until they are cool enough to eat.