Lemongrass and Kaffir Lime Leaf Mousse with Mango Coulis


Again with the tropical flavours! I'm sorry (not really) but they're just so darn good. Even though it's still miserable and rainy and a little cold here, I want bright and fresh and light in my desserts! And I know that New York had snow the other day and some people are still shovelling their driveways, but the calendar says it's spring, so I'm going with that.


This is a very light and airy mousse made with two kinds of egg foams, so it feels almost weightless! The mango coulis is thick and luscious and contrasts the lighter than air texture of the mousse. The dissolves so deliciously in your mouth while the mango coulis lingers for a while longer.


Super fresh, super light (texture-wise, not calorie-wise! this is not a healthy dessert!), and super flavourful. Get outta that snowed-in/rain-drenched funk you're in! Get your spring cleaning going (ugh...) and do those taxes that you've been putting off (just me?). Or, y'know, just eat this dessert and feel like your long hibernation is coming to an end.




Lemongrass and Kaffir Lime Leaf Mousse with Mango Coulis

Lemongrass and Kaffir Lime Leaf Mousse
Recipe adapted from Frozen Desserts

87 g lemongrass
5 g kaffir lime leaves
316 g heavy cream

50 g sugar
72 g egg yolks

119 g sugar
59 g egg whites

Mango Coulis

200 g ataulfo mango flesh
20 g honey


For the mousse, crush the lemongrass and combine with 100 g of cream with the kaffir lime leaves. Bring to a boil, cover, and steep for 2 hours, stirring occasionally.

Strain out the lemongrass and leaves through a fine-mesh strainer and chill. Once cold, combine with the remaining cream. Whip the cream to medium-stiff peaks, reserve in the fridge.

Make the pâte à bombe. Place the egg yolks in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Place the sugar in a saucepan with just enough water to make a paste. Dissolve the sugar over low heat, then increase to medium-high and cook the sugar to 115 C/239 F. When the sugar reaches 110 C/230 F, start whipping the yolks. Once the yolks start turning a pale yellow and have tripled in volume, pour the hot sugar down the side of the bowl and continue whipping until the yolks quadruple in volume and form a ribbon. Transfer to a clean bowl and set aside. Wash the mixer bowl and dry.

Next, make the italian meringue. Place the remaining 59 grams egg whites in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Combine the 236 grams sugar and water in a small saucepan and heat over medium-high heat until the syrup reaches 110 C/230 F.

Letting the syrup continue to cook, add a pinch of sugar to the egg whites, turn the mixer to medium speed, and whip to soft peaks. If the whites reach soft peaks before the syrup reaches 120 C/248 F, reduce the speed to the lowest setting, just to keep them moving.

When the syrup reaches 120 C/248 F, remove the pan from the heat. Turn the mixer to medium-low speed and slowly add the syrup, pouring it between the side of the bowl and 
the whisk. The meringue will deflate. Increase the speed to medium and whip for 5 minutes, or until the whites hold stiff, glossy peaks. 

Fold the italian meringue into the pâte à bombe, and then fold the whipped cream into the mixture. Portion into glasses and refrigerate until set, about 2 hours.

For the mango coulis, roughly chop the mango into small pieces and add the honey. Using an immersion blender or blender, create a smooth purée. Strain through a fine-mesh sieve and portion onto the mousse. 

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