Passion Fruit Millefeuille


Passion fruit tends to be one of those ingredients that makes the amateur baker think, "Oh, well, I'd never be able to find passion fruit anywhere so forget that recipe." Unless you live in the southern hemispheres, where actual real passion fruits are found (insanely jealous of you southern folk), passion fruits are not something you tend to see in a local market. The first time I tried a passion fruit was in pastry school, actually, just last year. It's a pity because passion fruit is a wonderful flavour - bright, tangy, sweet, tropical, and just a tiny bit floral. 

So you should be very excited when I tell you that getting your hands on good quality passion fruit purée is not as difficult as you might think!!! 



I know that I have readers from all over the world and Amazon may or may not ship to every where, so I've tried to find sources for anyone and everyone to experience one of the most delicious flavours ever.







I really encourage home bakers to try their hand at new flavours that they have never tried before. Passion fruit may seem like an unreachable flavour that only professionals use but with a little bit of searching, you can find it.

I'm hoping to bring some interesting and new flavours to this blog in the coming months - maybe Yuzu, Kalamansi, or Bergamot! Winter citrus shouldn't just be able blood oranges and meyer lemons, after all.



Passion Fruit Millefeuille


Passion Fruit Curd
Recipe adapted from Elements of Dessert

90 g passion fruit purée
10 g lemon juice
100 g sugar
120 g yolks
5 g gelatin sheets, bloomed
165 g butter, diced

Puff Pastry
Recipe from Bouchon Bakery

Beurrage
400 g European style butter (in one piece)

Dough
225 g water
25 g white wine vinegar
500 g all-purpose flour
10 g kosher salt
50 g unsalted butter, melted but not hot


For the butter block (beurrage), place a piece of parchment on the work surface. Center the 330 g of butter on the paper and top with a second piece of parchment paper. Pound the top o the butter from left to right with a rolling pin to begin to flatten it. The parchment paper will be stuck to the butter: lift off the top piece and place it butter side up on the work surface. Flip the butter over onto the parchment paper, turning it 90 degrees. Top with the second piece of parchment paper. Continue to fatten the butter as before until you have a rectangle 6 1/2 by 8 by 1/2 inch thick. Wrap tightly in parchment paper and refrigerate for at least 8 hours, but preferably overnight.

For the dough, combine the water and vinegar in a liquid measuring cup.

PLace the flour and salt in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook and mix on the lowest setting for about 15 seconds to combine. Increase the speed to low, slowly adding about half the vinegar-water mixture, and mix for 30 seconds to combine. Add more of the vinegar-water mixture, reserving abut 30 g until the flour is thoroughly moistened. Scrape down the sides and the bottom of the bowl. With the mixer running on low speed, mix in any dry ingredients that have settled in the bottom, then slowly pour in the butter. After about 30 seconds, the dough should begin to gather together in the center of the bowl. Stop the mixer before it comes together around the hook and feel the dough: it should feel tacky but shouldn't stick to your fingers. It if feels at all dry, turn the mixer to low and add the reserved water in very small amounts as needed.

Spray a medium bowl with non stick spray and lightly dust the work surface with flour. Turn the dough out onto the work surface and knead it for several minutes. The dough will not be completely smooth but will have some variance in texture, much like a bread dough. Lift the dough and tuck under the edges to form a ball, then place it seam side down in the prepared bowl.

With a sharp paring knife, score a large 1/2 inch deep X in the top of the dough to help it relax. Cover the bowl tightly with plastic wrap, pressing it against the surface of the dough, and refrigerate for at least 8 hours, or preferably overnight.

To encase the butter block, lightly flour the work surface and a heavy rolling pin. Turn the dough out onto the work surface and lightly dust the top with flour. Roll the dough outward from the center, rotating it frequently, and flipping and fluffing it from time to time, adding just enough flour to the work surface, dough, and/or rolling pin to prevent sticking, until you have a 12 to 13 inch circle about 3/8 inch thick. The dough should still be cold; if not, transfer it to a parchment lined sheet pan and refrigerate until chilled. 

Lay the butter in the center of the dough. Stretch and fold the two opposite sides of the dough over the longer sides of the butter block to touch in the center, without overlapping. Fold over the other two sides to meet in the center, without overlapping. Pinch the edges together to seal. There should be no exposed butter.

To do the first turn, use the rolling pin to press down firmly on the dough across the seam from one side to the other to expand the dough. Turn the dough so the short end faces you. Roll to expand the length of the dough, flipping, fluffing, and turn the dough over and adding flour only as needed, until you have a rectangle approximately 24 by 9 inches and 3/8 inch thick.

Fold the bottom third of the dough up as if you were folding a letter. Fold the top third down to cover the bottom third. Turn the block 90 degrees so the dough resembles a book, with the opening on the right. You will continue this patter with each roll, and keeping the opening on the right will help you remember how to position the dough. You have completed your first turn: gently press a finger into the corner to mark it. Return to the sheet pan, cover with plastic wrap, and refrigerate for 2 hours.

For the second turn, lightly dust the work surface with flour. Place the dough on the work surface with the opening on the right. Expand the dough by pressing down firmly with the rolling pin, working up the length of the dough. Then pound the dough, also working up the length of the dough. Hitting the dough will warm the butter - if it is too cold, it will shatter rather than spread as you roll the dough. Roll out the dough as you did before to a 24 by 9 by 3/8 inch rectangle. At this point, the short ends may have become rounded. If they are, trim the more rounded end to create a straighter edge. Fold in the untrimmed third of the dough and use the trimmings as necessary to fit. As you patch, be certain that all the layers of the dough are running in the same direction. Fold over the top their of the dough. Turn the block 90 degrees, so the opening is on the right. You have completed the second turn; gently press two fingers into a corner to mark the dough. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 2 hours.

For the third and fourth turn, repeat all the steps for turn 2, marking the dough with the corresponding number of fingerprints and refrigerating it for 2 hours after each turn.

For the fifth turn, repeat all the steps and mark the dough with five fingerprints. Refrigerate the dough for at least 8 hours, but preferably overnight. 

To finish the dough, line the back of a sheet pan with parchment paper and lightly dust the work surface with flour. Place the dough on the work surface with the opening on the right. It is especially critical at this stage that the dough remains cold; refrigerate as needed. Lightly dust the top of the dough and roll it outward from the center, flipping, fluffing, and rotating it and turning it over, adding only enough flour to the work surface, dough, and/or pin as necessary to prevent sticking. Roll the dough to the size of the sheet pan, about 3/8 inch thick. If the dough becomes too difficult to roll, place it on the pan and refrigerate until cold, the return to the work surface and continue to roll it.

Return the dough to the sheet pan and refrigerate for at least 1 hour, or freeze for 15 minutes, to chill and relax the dough before using it.

Lightly flour the work surface and a rolling pin. Lightly dust the top of the puff pastry and roll; it outward from the center, flipping, fluffing, and rotating it and turning it over, adding only enough flour to the work surface, dough, and/or pin as necessary to prevent sticking. Roll the dough to a 12 1/2 by 16 inch rectangle. If the dough becomes too difficult to roll, place it on a sheet pan and refrigerate until cold, then return it to the work surface and continue to roll it.

Set the dough on a sheet pan and refrigerate for at least 1 hour, or freeze for 30 minutes, to chill and relax.

Preheat the oven to 350 F.

Cut a piece of parchment paper the size of the sheet pan. Lay the parchment paper on top of the dough and, using a pizza wheel or a large chef's knife, trim the dough to the size of the sheet. Then cut the puff into 12 by 3 inch rectangles. 

Spray the sheet pan lightly with non stick spray and line it with parchment paper. Gently transfer the puff rectangles to the sheet pan, leaving about 2 inches of space between each strip of dough. Place the sheet pan in the freezer for 5 to 10 minutes, until the puff pastry is cold.

Top the puff pastry with a piece of parchment paper and another sheet pan to keep it very flat.

Bake for 1 hour, or until the bottom of the pastry is a rich golden brown.

Remove the sheet from the top of the pastry, but leave the parchment paper in place. Invert the pastry onto the back of a sheet pan. Cover the pastry with a piece of parchment and another sheet pan. Bake for another 15 minutes, or until the bottom is light golden brown.

Remove the top sheet pan and parchment paper and bake for 8 to 10 minutes, until the pastry is cooked trough and a very rich golden brown. Remove from the oven and let the pastry cool on a cooling rack.


For the passion fruit curd, combine the purée, lemon juice, and sugar in a saucepan over medium heat. Whisk the yolks into the saucepan and continue whisking constantly until the mixture thickens (80 to 85 C). Add the bloomed gelatin. 

Remove from heat and let it cool for a minute or two, stirring. Slowly add the butter a few pieces at a time, whisking after each addition, until all the butter has been incorporated. Transfer the curd to an airtight container, place a piece of plastic wrap directly on the surface to prevent a skin from forming, and refrigerate for 2 hours.

Transfer the passion fruit curd into a piping bag. Pipe the curd onto the puff pastry, then top with a second piece of puff and gently press down to ensure it will stay. Top with a quenelle of chantilly, if desired, and serve immediately.


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